Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The following is a Facebook post of mine from yesterday:

On Facebook Trending (in the upper right of your screen), I found a clip of the following headline from today on CNN.com:  “The Coretta Scott King letter Elizabeth Warren was trying to read.”  [http://www.cnn.com/…/elizabeth-warren-coretta-sc…/index.html]

Is that statement true?  Yes.  Does that statement, as a featured headline, herald the truth of the story.  No.

CNN.com ultimately tells the truth of the story, but furthers its dishonesty by purposely coloring the truth with a concoction of partisan rhetoric:  “On Tuesday night, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren attempted to read part of the letter on the Senate floor.  Republicans cried foul — charging that Warren violated Senate rules against impugning another senator.  A party-line vote upheld that decision, turning what could have been an ordinary late-night partisan floor speech for C-SPAN devotees into a national story.”

What is the uncolored truth of the story?  On Tuesday night, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren attempted to impugn another senator, Jeff Sessions, through the use of a Coretta Scott King letter.  Republicans charged that Warren violated Senate rules prohibiting such impugning.  A vote upheld that decision, turning the attempt into a national story.

This attempt by CNN.com to color a truthful story with partisan rhetoric is a prime example of fake news.

An essential reading on writing truthful journalism is “Politics and the English Language” by George Orwell:  http://www.orwell.ru/library/essays/politics/english/e_polit

Advertisements