On February 21, 1965, in Manhattan's Audubon Ballroom, Malcolm X began to speak to a meeting of the Organization of Afro-American Unity, when a disturbance broke out in the crowd of 400.  As Malcolm X and his bodyguards moved to quiet the disturbance, a man rushed forward and shot Malcolm in the chest with a sawed-off shotgun.  Two other men charged the stage and fired handguns, hitting him 16 times.  Shabazz was in the audience near the stage with her daughters.  When she heard the gunfire, she grabbed the children and pushed them to the floor beneath the bench, where she shielded them with her body.  When the shooting stopped, Shabazz ran toward her husband and tried to perform CPR.  Police officers, and Malcolm X's associates, carried him to a stretcher, and brought him to Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.  Angry onlookers caught and beat one of the assassins, who was arrested on the scene.  Eyewitnesses identified two more suspects.  All three men, who were members of the Nation of Islam, were convicted, and sentenced to life in prison.

On February 21, 1965, in Manhattan’s Audubon Ballroom, Malcolm X began to speak to a meeting of the Organization of Afro-American Unity, when a disturbance broke out in the crowd of 400. As Malcolm X and his bodyguards moved to quiet the disturbance, a man rushed forward and shot Malcolm in the chest with a sawed-off shotgun. Two other men charged the stage and fired handguns, hitting him 16 times. Shabazz was in the audience near the stage with her daughters. When she heard the gunfire, she grabbed the children and pushed them to the floor beneath the bench, where she shielded them with her body. When the shooting stopped, Shabazz ran toward her husband and tried to perform CPR. Police officers, and Malcolm X’s associates, carried him to a stretcher, and brought him to Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Angry onlookers caught and beat one of the assassins, who was arrested on the scene. Eyewitnesses identified two more suspects. All three men, who were members of the Nation of Islam, were convicted, and sentenced to life in prison.  Two of the men were released in 1980 and the third in 2010.

The following text, and voice, is from:  Malcolm X, as Told to Alex Haley.  The Autobiography of Malcolm X.  New York:  Ballantine Books, 1965.  p 154-191:

Out of the blue one day, Bimbi told me flatly, as was his way, that I had some brains, if I’d use them.  I had wanted his friendship, not that kind of advice.  I might have cursed another convict, but nobody cursed Bimbi.  He told me I should take advantage of the prison correspondence courses and the library.

When I had finished the eighth grade back in Mason, Michigan, that was the last time I’d thought of studying anything that didn’t have some hustle purpose.  And the streets had erased everything I’d ever learned in school; I didn’t know a verb from a house.  My sister Hilda had written a suggestion that, if possible in prison, I should study English and penmanship; she had barely been able to read a couple of picture post cards I had sent her when I was selling reefers on the road.

So, feeling I had time on my hands, I did begin a correspondence course in English.  When the mimeographed listings of available books passed from cell to cell, I would put my number next to titles that appealed to me which weren’t already taken.

Through the correspondence exercises and lessons, some of the mechanics of grammar gradually began to come back to me.

After about a year, I guess, I could write a decent and legible letter.  About then, too, influenced by having heard Bimbi often explain word derivations, I quietly started another correspondence course—in Latin.

. . .

I never got a single reply.  The average hustler and criminal was too uneducated to write a letter.  I have known many slick, sharp-looking hustlers, who would have you think they had an interest in Wall Street; privately, they would get someone else to read a letter if they received one.

Original Caption: 1944-Boston, MA: Malcolm Little, at age 18, at the time of an arrest for larceny, police photograph front and profile.

Original Caption: 1944-Boston, MA: Malcolm Little, at age 18, at the time of an arrest for larceny, police photograph front and profile.

. . .

It was because of my letters that I happened to stumble upon starting to acquire some kind of a homemade education.

I became increasingly frustrated at not being able to express what I wanted to convey in letters that I wrote, especially those to Mr. Elijah Muhammad.  In the street, I had been the most articulate hustler out there—I had commanded attention when I said something.  But now, trying to write simple English, I not only wasn’t articulate, I wasn’t even functional.  How would I sound writing in slang, the way I would say it something such as, “Look, daddy, let me pull your coat about a cat, Elijah Muhammad—“

Many who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television, or those who read something I’ve said, will think I went to school far beyond the eighth grade.  This impression is due entirely to my prison studies.

Charlestown State Prison front entrance.  Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Charlestown State Prison front gate. Charlestown, Massachusetts.

It had really begun back in the Charlestown Prison, when Bimbi first made me feel envy of his stock of knowledge.  Bimbi had always taken charge of any conversation he was in, and I had tried to emulate him.  But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinese.  When I just skipped those words, of course, I really ended up with little idea of what the book said.  So I had come to the Norfolk Prison Colony still going through only book-reading motions.  Pretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I did.

I saw that the best thing I could do was get hold of a dictionary—to study, to learn some words.  I was lucky enough to reason also that I should try to improve my penmanship.  It was sad.  I couldn’t even write in a straight line.  It was both ideas together that moved me to request a dictionary along with some tablets and pencils from the Norfolk Prison Colony school.

I spent two days just riffling uncertainly through the dictionary’s pages.  I’d never realized so many words existed!  I didn’t know which words I needed to learn.  Finally, just to start some kind of action, I began copying.

In my slow, painstaking, raged handwriting, I copied into my tablet everything printed on that first page, down to the punctuation marks.

I believe it took me a day.  Then, aloud, I read back, to myself, everything I’d written on the tablet.  Over and over, aloud, to myself, I read my own handwriting.

I woke up the next morning, thinking about those words—immensely proud to realize that not only had I written so much at one time, but I’d written words that I never knew were in the world.  Moreover, with a little effort, I also could remember what many of these words meant.  I reviewed the words whose meaning I didn’t remember.  Funny thing, from the dictionary first page right now, that “aardvark” springs to my mind.  The dictionary had a picture of it, a long-tailed, long-eared, burrowing African mammal, which lives off termites caught by sticking out its tongue as an anteater does for ants.

I was so fascinated that I went on—I copied the dictionary’s next page.  And the same experience came when I studied that.  With every succeeding page, I also learned of people and places and events from history.  Actually the dictionary is like a miniature encyclopedia.  Finally the dictionary’s A section had filled a whole tablet—and I went on into the B’s.  That was the way I started copying what eventually became the entire dictionary.  It went a lot faster after so much practice helped me to pick up handwriting speed.  Between what I wrote in my tablet, and writing letters, during the rest of my time in prison I would guess I wrote a million words.

I suppose it was inevitable that as my word-base broadened, I could for the first time pick up a book and read and now begin to understand what the book was saying.  Anyone who has read a great deal can imagine the new world that opened.  Let me tell you something:  from then until I left that prison, in every free moment I had, if I was not reading in the library, I was reading on my bunk.  You couldn’t have gotten me out of books with a wedge.  Between Mr. Muhammad’s teachings, my correspondence, my visitors—usually Ella and Reginald—and my reading of books, months passed without my even thinking about being imprisoned.  In fact, up to then, I never had been so truly free in my life.

The Norfolk Prison Colony’s library was in the school building.  A variety of classes as taught there by instructors who came from such places as Harvard and Boston university.  The weekly debates between inmate teams were also held in the school building.  You would be astonished to know how worked up convict debaters and audiences would get over subjects like “Should Babies Be Fed Milk?”

Available on the prison library’s shelves were books on just about every general subject.  Much of the big private collection that Parkhurst had willed to the prison was still of old books.  Some of them looked ancient:  covers faded, old-time parchment-looking binding.  Parkhurst, I’ve mentioned, seemed to have been principally interested in history and religion.  He had the money and the special interest to have a lot of books that you wouldn’t have in general circulation.  Any college library would have been lucky to get that collection.

As you can imagine, especially in a prison where there was heavy emphasis on rehabilitation, an inmate was smiled upon if he demonstrated an unusually intense interest to books.  There was a sizable number of well-read inmates, especially the popular debaters.  Some were said by many to be practically walking encyclopedias.  They were almost celebrities.  No university would ask any student to devour literature as I did when this new world opened to me, of being able to read and understand.

I read more in my room than in the library itself.  An inmate who was known to read a lot could check out more than the permitted maximum number of books.  I preferred reading in the total isolation of my own room.

When I had progressed to really serious reading, every night at about ten P.M. I would be outraged with the “lights out.”  It always seemed to catch me right in the middle of something engrossing.

Fortunately, right outside my door was a corridor light that cast a glow into my room.  The glow was enough to read by, once my eyes adjusted to it.  So when “lights out” came, I would sit on the floor where I could continue reading in that glow.

At one-hour intervals the night guards paced past every room.  Each time I heard the approaching footsteps, I jumped into bed and feigned sleep.  And as soon as the guard passed, I got back out of bed onto the floor area of that light-glow, where I would read for another fifty-eight minutes—until the guard approached again.  That went on until three or four every morning.  Three or four hours of sleep a night was enough for me.  Often in the years in the streets I had slept less than that.

. . .

I can remember accurately the very first set of books that really impressed me.  I have since bought that set of books and have it at home for my children to read as they grow up.  It’s called Wonders of the World.  It’s full of pictures of archeological finds, statues that depict, usually, non-European people.

. . .

. . . my alma mater was books, a good library.  Every time I catch a plane, I have with me a book that I want to read—and that’s a lot of books these days.

. . .

I don’t think anybody ever got more out of going to prison than I did.  In fact, prison enabled me to study far more intensively than I would have if my life had gone differently and I had attended some college.  I imagine that one of the biggest troubles with colleges is there are too many distractions, too much panty-raiding, fraternities, and boola-boola and all of that.  Where else but in a prison could I have attacked my ignorance by being able to study intensely sometimes so much as fifteen hours a day?

. . .

Standing up and speaking before an audience was a thing that throughout my previous life never would have crossed my mind.  Out there in the streets, hustling, pushing dope, and robbing.  I could have had the dreams from a pound of hashish and I’d never have dreamed anything so wild as that one day I would speak in coliseums and arenas, at the greatest American universities, and on radio and television, programs, not to mention speaking all over Egypt and Africa, and in England.

But I will tell you that, right there, in the prison, debating, speaking to a crowd, was as exhilarating to me as the discovery of knowledge through reading had been.  Standing up there, the faces looking up at me, the things in my head coming out of my mouth, while my brain searched for the next best thing to follow what I was saying, and if I could away them to my side by handling it right, then I had won the debate—once my feet got wet, I was gone on debating.  Whichever side of the selected subject was assigned to me, I’d track down and study everything I could find on it.  I’d put myself in my opponent’s place and decide how I’d try to win if I had the other side and then I’d figure a way to knock down those points.

. . .

I had come to prison with 20/20 vision.  But when I got sent back to Charlestown, I had read so much by the lights-out glow in my room at the Norfolk Prison Colony that I had astigmatism and the first pair of the eyeglasses that I have worn ever since.

It was in August when they gave me a lecture, a cheap L’il Abner suit, and a small amount of money, and I walked out of the gate.  I never looked back, but that doesn’t make me any different from a million inmates who have left a prison behind them.

Additionally:

By author, Alex Haley from the introduction to:  Malcolm X, as told to Alex Haley.  The Autobiography of Malcolm X.  New York:  Ballantine Books, 1965.  p ix-xiv.

Malcolm’s attitude toward the white man underwent a marked change in 1964—a change that contributed to his break with Elijah Muhammad and his [Elijah’s] racist doctrines. Malcolm’s meteoric eruption on the national scene brought him into wider contact with white men who were not the “devils” he had thought they were.  He was much in demand as a speaker at student forums in Eastern universities and had appeared at many by the end of his short career as a national figure.  He always spoke respectfully and with a certain surprise of the positive response of white students to his lectures.

. . .

Assassins’ bullets ended Malcolm’s career before he was able to develop this new approach, which in essence recognized the Negroes as an integral part of the American community—a far cry from Elijah Muhammad’s doctrine of separation. Malcolm had reached the midpoint in redefining his attitude to this country and the white-black relationship, a segment of the United States represented by overt white supremacists in the South and cover white supremacists in the North.

. . .

American autobiographical literature is filled with numerous accounts of remarkable men who pulled themselves to the summit by their bootstraps.  Few are as poignant as Malcolm’s memoirs.  As testimony to the power of redemption and the force of human personality, the autobiography of Malcolm X is a revelation.

New York, June 1965

. . .

From actor, Ossie Davis, regarding his eulogy at Malcolm X’s funeral from:  Malcolm X, as told to Alex Haley.  The Autobiography of Malcolm X.  New York: Ballantine Books, 1965.  p 457-460.

Protocol and common sense require that Negroes stand back and let the white man speak up for us, defend us, and lead us from behind the scene in our fight.  This is the essence of Negro politics.  But Malcolm said to hell with that!  Get up off your knees and fight your own battles.  That’s the way to win back your self-respect.  That’s the way to make the white man respect you.  And if he won’t let you live like a man, he certainly can’t keep you from dying like one!

. . .

Malcolm kept snatching our lies away.  He kept shouting the painful truth we whites and blacks did not want to hear from all the housetops.  And he wouldn’t stop for love nor money.

. . .

But in explaining Malcolm, let me take care not to explain him away.  He had been a criminal, an addict, a pimp, and a prisoner; a racist, and a hater, he had really believed the white man was a devil.  But all this had changed.  Two days before his death, in commenting to Gordon Parks about his past life he said:  “That was a mad scene.  The sickness and madness of those days!  I’m glad to be free of them.”

And Malcolm was free.  No one who knew him before and after his trip to Mecca could doubt that he had completely abandoned racism, separatism, and hatred.  But he had not abandoned his shock-effect statements, his bristling agitation for immediate freedom in this country not only for blacks, but for everybody.

. . .

And if, to protect my relations with the many good white folks who make it possible for me to earn a fairly good living in the entertainment industry, I was too chicken, too cautious, to admit that fact when he was alive, I thought at least that now, when all the white folks are safe from him at last, I could be honest with myself enough to lift my hat for one final salute to that brave, black, ironic gallantry, which was his style and hallmark, that shocking zing of fire-and-be-damned-to-you, so absolutely absent in every other Negro man I know, which brought him, too soon, to his death.

http://malcolmx.com/index.html

For more on Malcolm X, please see the above link and below, my previous post:

[Malcolm X’s “The Ballot or the Bullet”].

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